n98-magerun

How to easily dump Magento database with n98-magerun

It looks I felt in love with a n98-magerun tool. I already talked about my favourite n98-magerun commands and about a command which allows to generate fake customer data. Today I’m going to continue n98-magerun post series and focus on a command which allows to make database dump very easily. n98-magerun.phar db:dump in addition to commands mentioned in previous blog posts is another one must have.

The command allows to dump a database very easily. Similar to a n98magerun mysql-client command, it doesn’t require me to enter a password and look for any connection details. It automatically generates a dump file name based on a current date and time, allows to use built-in filters to exclude big utility tables and finally creates an archive after completing the dump.

Sample calls may look as follows:

First call produced a 5.1 GB file containing all database tables. Second stripped a bunch of database tables such as changelog tables, index tables, reports or logs tables and it resulted in reducing the database dump to 3.1 GB. Third one called with a compression option reduced size to about 251 MB. Third gain is expected and it could be also achieved with one additional gz command call, but it’s really convenient to do a gzipped dump in one command call.

Stripping not needed database tables can save gigabytes of transfer when working with a big database. However, it won’t fit all use cases, for example in which you need to prepare a dump to debug index problems where you need to get an exact state of a Magento application database.

Bring a lot of customers to Magento store… using n98-magerun

Recently I talked about my favourite n98-magerun commands, this time I’ll continue that topic. Let’s see how to easily add a lot of customers to a Magento store. Of course it’s about adding fake data for testing purposes, unfortunately n98-magerun doesn’t help in bringing real ones :-)

Command customer:create:dummy allows you to create dummy customer accounts for testing purposes. It supports a few different locales and allows to generate any amount of accounts.

It took about 13 minutes to create 1000 customers, so it is able to fill a database with thousands of customers in a few hours. Sample output looks as follows:

Internally it uses https://github.com/fzaninotto/Faker. That library allows it to generate other assets like texts (either lorem ipsum or more real ones), addresses, phone numbers, companies, date and times, internet accounts, payment data and a few others.

I would love to see the ability to generate products using Faker and have a few more dummy methods incorporated into n98-magerun. The ability to generate products, customer addresses, maybe sales data would be great. However, the ability to generate fake customer accounts helps a lot and it’s a great start.

Top 10 n98-magerun command calls

n98-magerun is a very useful tool when working on Magento stores. It saves time and makes a lot of Magento development related tasks much easier. Check out a list of my 10 favorite commands.

1. dev:module:rewrite:conflicts

This one is a must have. It’s a good replacement for an Extension Conflict module which I have been using before I found the n98-magerun. It shows rewrite conflicts in a clean ASCII table:

2. mysql-client

Command opens a mysql command line client without need of looking for a host, a port and credentials in local.xml file.

However, it doesn’t work on a server with proc_open() function disabled.

3. cache:flush

It flushes all Magento caches. If a store uses filesystem cache, this command isn’t much more helpful than simple  rm -rf var/cache* var/full_page_cache/* . However, when using the n98-magerun I don’t need to wonder what cache type is used in a store and this command provides an interface working for all cache types.

The only glitch is that in some cases it doesn’t clean cache if file permissions are not correct.

4. sys:cron:list

Prints list of all active CRON jobs configured in a Magento store. It shows output in readable way, showing a job code, minutes, hours, days, month and week days.

Another usable command related to CRON may be sys:cron:history which lists recently finished CRON jobs.

5. sys:setup:run

It’s useful to run database updates from a command line when installing an extension or upgrading Magento.

Recently I used that when working on a Magento upgrade from 1.12 to 1.14. Frontend kept throwing error as PHP code was trying to use things which haven’t existed in the database yet, but sys:setup:run command dealt with that perfectly.

6. dev:theme:duplicates

This could be used when working on templates, to clean them from not needed files. I ran that command in 3 projects I’m working on and it found a few duplicated templates.

7. sys:info

Command allows to quickly show an overall picture on the store. It shows a store edition and version, list of vendors coming from all code pools and a few other information. Additionally it shows basic factors which can determine the store size – amount of attributes, categories and products.

It’s handy when starting to work on an already existing site.

8. sys:check

It checks for missing system paths such as media/, var/ or a local.xml config file and checks if required PHP modules are installed. For example on my local server it keeps complaining about a missing index.php.sample file and about missing bytecode cache extension. I will need to get rid of this to get a nice green output :-)

Additionally it checks if each base URL contains dot, however I don’t get this part.

9. dev:console

This opens an interactive console with Magento initialized. It’s marked as experimental but works pretty well. It allows to run code in interactive way, most useful when I need to check multiple objects one by one eg. go through blog posts. For example to open console run:

And then run code to dump the blog post data:

Or order:

10. sys:modules:list

It lists all modules along with fields like code pool, key, version and status.

Documentation says it’s possible to filter list by a code pool and a status, but I couldn’t get it working. It simply shows nothing when I use any filter. However, even without filtering it’s pretty useful.

I chose these 10 commands as most interesting, but there are many other handy tools: a command for working with database dumps, a command for debugging Magento configs and all toggle commands which allow to enable/disable things like a cache, a demo notice, template hints and many more.

Take a look on http://magerun.net to see all of them or better just play with the tool. Also make sure to subscribe my RSS feed or my twitter as soon I will talk more about cool n98-magerun use cases.